Our Big Blue Marble

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Morpheus Morpheus 3 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #11596
    Zenscreamer
    Zenscreamer
    Participant

    As some may know from a discussion in the forums here I have just gotten myself a cheap inflatable globe.

    I was motivated to do so by a video online called Ancient Knowledge. The creator of that video has compiled a number of different sources under public use permissions, and does not specifically cite his source for this section, but based on the high production quality I have to assume that it is our of a professional production house.

    I haven’t yet felt the need to figure out where exactly the clip came from, but considering the subject matter I would not be surprised if Graham Hancock was involved. In fact, in looking up the relevant data on the web, I tripped over a series of posts in the “Official” Graham Hancock site going over this material, which appears to be a re-post of long-running single-page version of the same text. Both versions make my brain overload pretty quickly, but maybe that’s just me.

    Anyway, when I saw this video a year or so ago, I wondered if I could re-create the line myself, and when the discussion in the forums here mentioned above wandered to the issue of the “bulge” at the (current) Equator and the effects on sea levels I knew I had to try the little “move the Equator” experiment myself. From Jim Alison’s page I have the following image as a guide:

    worldline

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  • #11605
    Zenscreamer
    Zenscreamer
    Participant

    My husband thinks I’m nuts, and that this line is a result of selection bias. I have countered that until I have a thesis, it can’t be disproven, so I need to get on with the job in the first place.

    As can be gathered from the rest of the video linked above, the megalithic sites most at issue share features such as earthquake-resistant construction techniques, high precision in craftsmanship, and frequently building blocks of extraordinary size. Not all sites share all features, so each one deserves careful study, but here I’m looking for the overall picture. The thesis should work best for the most prominent and extraordinary sites.

    Working with the list presented in the video, I stuck little bits of paper to my globe, and then ran a piece of string around it to represent the line. Considering that the globe itself isn’t even properly spherical, the approximation works surprisingly well:

    IMG_1436IMG_1437IMG_1438

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  • #11621
    Zenscreamer
    Zenscreamer
    Participant

    So far so good. Now that I have an “equator”, what about some poles to go with that?

    The referenced video speaks of two pairs of sites that are opposite one another on the “great circle” — I did a quick check on Google and measured in meters these pairs of sites do an excellent job splitting the globe in half, in each case.

    One pair is made of the huge constellation of sites centered at Machu Picchu on the coast of Peru, matched with an equally extensive complex of ritual sites in the Angkor plain in Cambodia, with the most famous being Angkor Wat, but the earliest known at Kampang Thom. The second pair connects Easter Island to Mohenjo Daro, a formerly “lost city” along the banks of the Indus river adjacent to the mountains between India & Pakistan. Whether either site of this second pair makes a good example of a “megalithic site” I am not in position to judge, but with the two pairs in hand I should be able to confirm “poles” where the two “longitude” lines thus created cross.

    My spitball version does cross close to the location indicated in the Jim Alison material referenced above, at 59 degrees 42 minutes North, by 139 degrees 17 minutes West, near the Pacific coast in Alaska. The corresponding South pole would be somewhere off the coast of Antarctica.

    IMG_1439IMG_1441

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  • #11628
    Morpheus
    Morpheus
    Participant

    @zenscreamer

    Great work. This has been on my mind for some time. We need to bring Michael Steinbacher into this discussion given how big of fan of Velikovsky he is and the work he does.

    Maybe Mrs. Cog could reach out to him and see if he might join. :)

    • #11631
      Zenscreamer
      Zenscreamer
      Participant

      Love love love Michael Steinbacher! In the videos he seems very approachable.

      Great idea, Morpheus!

  • #11629
    Zenscreamer
    Zenscreamer
    Participant

    The big surprise came in looking more closely at the “longitude” line created by the Machu Picchu-to-Angkor “great circle” — although not marked as such, something approximating this line is referenced in the middle of the Jim Alison material, displayed on Page 14 in the “Official” Graham Hancock site. This page lists

    I didn’t check all the locations he lists, but for those I did, Within a surprisingly tight approximation, the “longitude” line connects the Machu Picchu area with:

    • Ingapirca, Ecuador
    • Tazumal, El Salvador
    • Palenque, Mexico
    • Chaco Canyon & Mesa Verde, Colorado

    Mesa Verde is the largest archaeological preserve in the United States.

    This line also happens to trace part of the Rio Grande, and to brush the Great Salt Lake and Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Here is my fairly incompetent rendering, where I have stuck bits of paper to the globe to represent the sites:

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  • #11639
    Zenscreamer
    Zenscreamer
    Participant

    With all that prep behind me, I’m ready to take on the “pseudo-science” third rail– “the Great Pyramid at Giza” —

    I just lay out my circle using the “poles” already established, and centering the string on the nile delta (certainly close enough for my needs) and gee whiz…

    Not only does the line trace the course of the Nile (which we already know runs basically North-South) but it touches Khartoum in Sudan (don’t they suddenly need saving, what?), but it climbs up into the mountains of Africa and passes over the highest point of the continent, Mt Kilimanjaro.

    OK — I really can’t make this up. On a lark, I decided to Google “Mozambique ancient ruins” based on the line for shits-n-giggles and I found the “hidden” megalithic site the discoverer calls “Adam’s Calendar” that purports to be the “world’s oldest” . Seriously!

    IMG_1445

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    • #11641
      Morpheus
      Morpheus
      Participant

      Cool stuff. You need to do a video of this to show the visual. Or let’s get someone to animate it.

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